The Poisoner

Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

Credit: Wikimedia Commons.

There he is again, my neighbor. The one I call “The Poisoner” and he is living up to his name. It is a sight that invades my vision 4 or 5 times a year; a big guy with a large canister spraying poison like a madman all over his yard.

Sometimes it’s the weeds in the lawn, other times it’s the poor green growth that dares to show itself between the cracks in the sidewalk. On a few occasions when he really gets going , he sprays the entire parameter of his house.  He wears no mask, no gloves, just him and the Roundup.

When he is finished, nothing is left alive. Except his poor lawn which is a sickly palish green despite the many hours he spends on it. He is a warrior of sorts; it is him against nature. I think he’s fighting an expensive and time-consuming battle that we all pay for in the end.

Whenever I see him with his spray can, I try not to become angry. It used to make my blood boil; to watch him spray his poison like there’s no tomorrow while I’m digging up dandelions by hand.  As the years have passed and my work has gotten easier due to the many organic gardening techniques I have learned and implemented, his work has not diminished…it has seemed to only increase.

Credit: SBI

YES, this is my actual yard. Credit: SBI

While I enjoy a healthy green lawn with a myriad of various flowers surrounding; a yard that is truly bursting with life. He lives in a dead zone.  It must be frustrating to him. He must notice during the summer while he waters his lawn every single day, I water mine once a week yet mine is still green and his has brown patches.

I suppose I could let him in on my “secrets” but they aren’t really secret. I learned about these techniques from books I found at our local library which is literally just steps from our houses.  I suppose I am shy and I hate to admit that although I have talked to his wife, I haven’t spent much time conversing with him. He seems to me somewhat hostile and the glares he gives me may just be in my imagination. Frankly, I am hesitant to go over there and point out to him that what he’s doing is all wrong. People don’t like that. So call me chicken but whenever he gets to spraying his poison, I just get out of his way.

I thought in my naivety that he might learn from mine and other neighbor’s examples on how one can have a lovely yard without the use of such harmful chemicals but alas he has not.

I know he isn’t the only one who resorts to such methods. In the United States alone 80 million pounds of chemical pesticides were used on residential lawns last year. A staggering number to say the least.

Toxins from pesticides can remain in the body and build up in the liver. Even at what is considered “safe” levels, a person’s reactions can be mild to severe. High levels of exposure can be fatal. Some people are seemingly unaffected or mildly affected, while others become severely ill from similar levels of exposure. Some possible reactions include: Fatigue, Skin Irritations, Nausea, Vomiting, Breathing Problems, Brain Disorders, Blood Disorders, Liver & Kidney Damage, Reproductive Damage and (gasp) Cancer.

Whether or not a person uses these chemicals themselves these toxins find their way to us by seeping into the groundwater and entering the environment where they damage and kill precious wildlife, toxic indeed!

According to the Environmental Protection Agency

Contaminated groundwater can affect the quality of drinking and other types of water supplies when it reaches the surface. Contaminated groundwater can affect the health of animals and humans when they drink or bathe in water contaminated by the groundwater or when they eat organisms that have themselves been affected by groundwater contamination.”

groundwaterjpg-c18e5dce766d777c

Here are some interesting Statistics about Pesticide contamination from The US Fish and Wildlife Service

  • In recent studies of major rivers and streams, one or more pesticides were detected more than 90% of the time in water, in more than 80% of fish sampled, and in 33% of major aquifers (Gilliom, Robert).
  • Pesticides are one of the 15 leading causes of impairment for streams included on States’ Clean Water Act section 303(d) lists of impaired waters.
  • Pesticides have also been identified as a potential cause of amphibian declines and deformities.
  • Pesticides are one of the potential causes pollinator species’ declines and declines of other beneficial insects.
Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Credit: Wikimedia Commons

I can’t see how some would think a substance that kills something would NOT be harmful. I know it is a lot of work keeping a lush weed-free lawn. Many people would say it is not worth the trouble and definitely not worth the resources. I have read about people getting rid of their lawn entirely and planting a vegetable garden. I can see the merit of that. Perhaps I may try that in the future….who knows? But today this is not what I am attempting to address.

So besides digging up the lawn entirely which I am truly tempted to do…how does one have a beautiful lawn without resorting to chemicals?

dandelions-

Credit: Public Domain

W E E D S

“What is a weed? A plant whose virtues have never been discovered.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson

I do admit that if one wants to go totally organic, which I will be getting to in the next paragraph, one will probably have to put up with a few weeds which aren’t so bad in reality. Many weed seeds provide food for birds. Weeds are a normal part of most lawns. When there are some types of weeds in the lawn such as white clover and bird’s foot trefoil, these weeds provide a source of nutrients for the soil and later for the grass itself. A good first step is identifying what weeds you do have and determining if they are annuals, perennials or biennial.   This helps you find out the correct method for controlling them. You can find some great information at WWW.msuturfweeds.net.

Annual weeds will generate from seeds and will grow to produce flowers that in turn produce more seeds. Remove them before the seed heads form and you will cut their life short. Biennials have a two-year life span, as with annuals. The trick is to get to them before they go to seed. Remove the seed head. This will do much to reduce the amount of weeds in your lawn overall.

Perennials are different. These weeds also spread by seed but they have nasty runners that spread under the soil. These runners produce rhizomes which are stems that grow horizontally underground and unbeknownst to you will survive the winter. These must be totally dug out of the lawn, when you do this some may come back. But don’t despair.

Weeds indicate the conditions of the soil. Certain weeds indicate certain problems and if you work to amend the soil this may help. For instance, if you have a problem with dandelions this could indicate that your lawn has an overabundance of nitrogen and on the other hand if you have too much clover in your lawn this could indicate not enough nitrogen. Nature is always in a delicate balance and problems occur when that balance is out of whack.

Monocultures are not natural and lawns aren’t really natural. They are just another symptom of the man over nature thing; something we humans have a problem with. I don’t want to sound like a broken record but the health and wellbeing of the natural world relies on a delicate balance and when that balance is thrown off problems will and do occur.

Credit: Public Domain

Credit: Public Domain

W A T E R

“Water is the driving force of all nature.”

Leonardo da Vinci

Water is essential to all life and a healthy lawn does need it especially in the summer. So how does one keep a green and lush lawn during those hot summer days?

Timing is important, Water your lawn during the early morning hours; the best time is between midnight and 9 am. This is giving the water a chance to enter the soil before it is exported by the hot summer sun. Watering in the evening causes the moisture to remain for too long in which there is a danger of fungus developing.

In general the optimal amount of water that a healthy lawn needs is only one inch per week. Of course some lawns have different needs. Some have more shade than others and it depends on climate as well. Be sure to leave your lawn a little on the long side as the longer blades help provide shade and aids in retaining moisture in the soil underneath. In addition, if you mow your lawn frequently it taxes the grass and it must work harder to regrow the top portion.

Of course you may if you choose to have your lawn go dormant in the summer; letting it turn brown. It may not look very good but dormancy is nature’s way of dealing with drought and your lawn will bounce back in no time once the rains return.

The subject of organics and pesticides is vast.  I am only covering a small part of this broad and expansive topic. Organic gardening relies heavily on soil health and the organisms living in the soil. This also depends on the elements present in the soil and how we can give back those nutrients which green growth thrives on. In future articles I will be covering that very important subject, but for now I will impart just one little tidbit on the matter…

Please try to be natural in the care of your yard and garden. Natural is not perfection. Nature is wild and random. It is what we came from and it is what is meant to be. We humans must stop trying to change this world too much. Mother Nature is turning on us, the very beings she created because we are destroying her.

The problem is huge and at times overwhelming but together step by step, we can save this planet!

Strawberryindigo.

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“The Earth we abuse and the living things we kill, will in the end, take their revenge; for in exploiting their presence we are diminishing our future.”

~Marla Mannes

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OUR LOVELY HOME

OUR LOVELY HOME

References and Suggested Reading

“Organic Lawn Care” By Sandy Baker © 2011

Environmental Statistics (statisticbrain.com)

Pesticides and Wildlife (fws.gov)

Herbicide poison and groundwater supply (mercola.com)

Just How do Pesticides Contaminate our Marine Life (examiner.com)

The Effects of pesticides (globalhealingcenter.com)

It’s not just bees: Popular pesticides are killing birds, too (mnn.com)

Pesticides & Your Pregnancy – Birth Defects, Pregnancy Complications, & Miscarriage (everydayfamily.com)

27 Reasons Why You should Consume Food Grown Using Organic Farming Methods (agricbusiness.com)

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37 thoughts on “The Poisoner

  1. Hello! What a lovely blog you have here! Happy to have stumbled upon it when Zemanta recommended it to me for my “Related Articles” section. I’ve just written about lawn chemicals myself, so your post was a very good fit. (Great job researching–so thorough!) Here’s the link where your post appears, in Related Articles at the bottom:
    http://www.joyfullygreen.com/2013/05/keep-off-the-grass-experts-sound-off-on-the-health-hazards-of-lawn-chemicals.html.
    Looking forward to reading more from you.
    Best,
    Joy

  2. Soz, another comment! But I just had to share ~ every time I catch a glimpse of the name of your post on my blog, I misread it as ‘The Prisoner’. And it’s just occurred to me now, getting the notification that you’d replied to my comment on ‘The Prisoner’, how accurate a mistake that is. Your neighbour is a prisoner of his own hatred, and is just extending his jail sentence by acting on that evil mind. He is truly an object of compassion, isn’t he.

  3. A beautiful lawn is in the eye of the beholder, as is a ‘weed’.
    Maybe pray for your neighbour to get some wisdom. It can’t do any harm. (Unlike his madness…)

  4. WONDERFUL post with lots of great information and graphics…. Thanks so much for sharing (I’ll be sending to friends not on WP as well). I pull most of my weeds by hand – and I live in the sub-tropics!! Land of LOTS of growth! And I use organic stuff…MINIMALLY. If at all, really. Mostly compost. And as you say – I fare far better than the poison-sprayers. It’s so sad to see, sadder now more than ever.

  5. Hey great post, I’m glad you are so mindful of the environment, and strive to preserve it naturally. I’m just as surprised as you why some people would rather be stubborn and ignorant, than to just as for help if what they’re doing isn’t working. People and their silly pride I guess. Enjoy your lush green organic lawn!

  6. Wow! Learned a lot about lawns, hope I have one. It wouls be rough to say something to him, but maybe you could talk about what you do for lawncare with his wife? She may pass it on to him? Either way your pic is lovely, it looks so green and peaceful. Simply an ahh moment.

  7. Well written and yes, it is difficult to speak to people like that and you’re right, it does seem they have something against nature. To me even the flowers of weeds look beautiful. Here in our yard the monkeys and birds do the pest control. I refuse to spray anything that’s harmful on the grass or for the weeds. Nature will do what is necessary and like you said, there are natural solutions. Thanks for sharing. :)

  8. I have tried so hard to increase the number of pollinators in my yard and garden. I know that it is an uphill battle as long as Home Depot sells yard toxins and poisons in the mega drum. I don’t know how to combat this.

    • Oh Charlie, I know what you mean…all I can say is that a little subtle social pressure may help. I just finished telling my good friend Cathy that I should get one of those signs proclaiming my “organic-ness”. The more I think about it, the more I think…”why haven’t I already done this”?…

      Thanks for thinking about those valuable pollinators, many people don’t give those little busy workers any thought, I don’t want to imagine a world without them…

  9. Fortunately we don’t have neighbours spraying poisonous chemicals, but they almost all put down pellets to kill slugs and snails…. supposedly not harmful to birds and hedgehogs who eat slugs, but surely not good if they kill. I hope all the bees and insects have the sense to fly over to you when he’s out spraying! (Your garden looks so green!)

    • Hello Cathy. I hate the slugs too but I haven’t had the heart to do anything about THEM. My Mom, or should I say Mum used to pour salt on the poor things…Yuck. MY other neighbors are organic, we talk about such things and some have signs proudly proclaiming this. Perhaps I should get one, or bettter yet make one.

  10. We use only organic insecticide and fertiliser, no harsh chemical products and there is nothing wrong in the garden and nature is protected. Both are also used sparingly.

  11. I just got me a push mower…. I figure I can certainly use the exercise and I hate dealing with smelly, noisy and temperamental gas engines. But I definitely let the grass go dormant in summer. Why waste water on grass?

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